There’s a game on? Also, a Red Letter day!

Ah, but you see, the Ravens ensured that I wouldn’t have to watch football this year. But this morning I did get rolling on the first shelving install (the new five-foot wide unit), following shopping…

Old shelving setup... w/dog

Old shelving setup… w/dog

Lexi always has to “help”, but actually through most of this process today she was a good girl, and slept on a chair in the library. I unloaded all of those shelves into stacks in the guest bedroom, then hauled the shelves downstairs. I’m going to make use of the white one in my storage room, for paints and such. The brown one is a bit crufty, and likely to sport a “free” sign on it, by the roadside, come the next sunny weekend day. Then I hauled the new shelves up stairs, and did final assembly in my office:

Final assembly of the new shelving

Final assembly

The shiny dark teal backers really look good! I got the deeper bottom unit together, then stood it up and down a few times while I adjusted the feet to match the floor: and the unit is level side to side, and canted just a bit back. Then I brought up the upper section, assembled it, and put it up top. It’s screwed to the lower section with countersunk stainless screws.

Shelving in place

Shelving in place

Now all that was left was to haul all the books back in, migrate my paperbacks over from their triple-deep stacks on the other side of the room (behind the camera in most of these shots), and load it all in:

New shelves loaded

New shelves loaded

Some of the media there is likely to move across the room to the four-foot wide shelves I’m going to build next, to leave room for more books here and there. But it’s big, stable, and I really do like it. It isn’t perfect, but I built it, and I’m happy about that.

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I’m chuffed to bits – DoD reported no casualties in the last week. I don’t think there’s been none since I started this ritual to ensure that I gave attention to the cost our troops pay for our foreign policies. Huzzah!

 

 

 

 

Another weekend gone

Also this weekend, I baked cookies, and made an army’s worth of chili. I used the last of the summer’s freezer-reserve tomato sauce, a couple of pounds each of ground turkey and ground spicy italian sausage, and mixed red kidney and black beans. Heat and chili powder added. Yum! Sadly, the cookies are almost gone…

I got the second coat of white on the shelving today. A small roller with a smooth-coat cover, and a gallon-size rolling grid solved the problems I was having with painting. I still have to decide what to do next: Poly or no poly. I’m thinking yes, because it’ll make the finish much more robust. And I shouldn’t be lazy about it.

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Our condolences to the family, friends, and unit of Sgt. Schoonhoven:

  • Sgt. Mark H. Schoonhoven, 38, of Plainwell, Michigan, died Jan. 20, at Brooke Army Medical Center, Fort Sam Houston, Texas from wounds suffered when enemy forces attacked his unit with an improvised explosive device on Dec. 15, 2012 in Kabul, Afghanistan.

Finishing in Stages

The woodshop isn’t big enough to build everything, then finish everything, then put everything in place up here in my office. SO … I’ve assembled the first set of shelves (which was done by the end of last weekend). Since then, I’ve been applying finishes. Four days of finish, just for the shelving backs. A coat of the dark teal, knock down the grain, and recoat with the teal. Coat once with satin finish oil-modified water-based polyurethane, sand with 320 grit, and recoat with the poly. The backs are stunning, but not photographable as standalone objects. You’ll see what I’m on about when they’re installed.

Last night, I started painting out the shelves in the selected off-white:

Painting the shelves

Painting the shelves

I didn’t finish that step last night – I was paged by work at about 80% completion. Since I had to put the brush in water, I ended up calling it a night. The painting is, frankly, a bit fiddly – I see why spray booths are so popular. But I don’t have space for one of those, either. I am going to go shopping tomorrow for applicators that are more suited to the work I’m doing…

I finished up the first coat of white today. I’ll work it tomorrow and recoat … by the weekend of 2 February these should be pictured in my office. Then I can start building the next set!

Have you been by Marcia’s Makings lately?

Happy 2013

Or as Jenny puts it, “The Library opened yesterday.” I like that metaphor. It’s a bit Doctor Who-ish, but cool.

I spent most of New Year’s Day doing production work down in the basement, trimming and cutting dadoes and rabbets for the other three shelving units. Tonight, I started assembly:

The Second Shelf in assembly

The Second Shelf

Wider

The shelving unit that goes beside the door is a two-piece: a 12″ deep bottom section, and a 9″ deep upper, totalling 7 feet tall. Here’s the next stage of assembly of the bottom section, glued up and curing right now:

Door Lower Shelving Glue Up

Door Lower Shelving Glue Up

This evening, I plan to get the side piece glued on, so that I can fabricate the back, and start preparing this unit for paint.

Shelving begins

Finished assembly on the bones of the trial shelving unit: It’ll stay in the workshop, sans face frame. The first half of one of the office lower shelves is in glue-up on the table saw extension:

Shelving assembly

Shelving assembly

Fixtures and Late Posting

Last night … I was playing Fallout 3, and went from game to sleep. My bad.

Today, I’m back in fabrication and assembly mode in the woodshop:

Cutting a rabbet

Cutting a rabbet

I’m running with the dadoe set installed for cutting 3/4″ slots for the shelves, but by embedding about half of that width into the sacrificial fence, I can also cut the rabbets for the back panel. Notice that I’m using a finger board to help keep the workpiece in control – a 4′ long side needs a third hand, and the finger board provides the safest method of control near the blades.

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Our condolences to Commander Price’s family, friends, and team:

  • Cdr. Job W. Price, 42, of Pottstown, Pennsylvania, died Dec. 22 of a non-combat related injury while supporting stability operations in Uruzgan Province, Afghanistan.

 

Knife and Fixtures

The work on the chef’s knife continued today:

Trimming the knife handle

Trimming the knife handle

The epoxy for side two cured overnight. I removed the clamps, and trimmed the sides down to near the tang, all the way around, using the scroll saw.

Sanding the knife handle

Sanding the knife handle

Sanding the knife handle was a multi-step process. This first phase used a couple of sizes and grits to get the wood down to the same profile as the tang. I used mini-sanding drums in the drill press for the task. Then I drilled through the rivet guide holes from the other side, then finished drilling the rivet profile in the handle. 0.177″ ∅ through, then 0.25″ ∅ drilled 0.21″ deep from each side for the rivet head.

I seated one side of each rivet using a hammer, after treating the drilled-out surface in the handle with cyanoacrylate adhesive. I put some more adhesive on the threads of the mating side and on the shoulder in the handle, then screwed each rivet together. Oh, yeah, the rivets: I got them from North Coast Knives – pleasant folks, quick & efficient order fulfillment, and lots of parts in stock for just about any sort of knife fabrication and repair you’re contemplating. Recommended!

Hacking off the rivet heads

Hacking off the rivet heads

Removing the rivet heads required application of the hacksaw. Sanding or grinding them all the way down would have caused too much heating … I know this, and caught it before I burnt the handle. Then sanding, a bit of carving, and a lot more sanding at progressively finer grits brought the knife to the place where I could apply the first coat of Danish Oil:

Applying finish

Applying finish

Three or four more applications are due, with sanding and/or rubbing with #0000 steel wool between each coat. This will be done Sunday, I think.

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 I also finished building my table saw fixtures today. Here in one image you can see both the outfeed extension table (the leg actually still needs hardware, so I’ll go get that tomorrow) and the over-size cross-cut sled I built. It’s not light, but it makes getting true 90° cuts possible on large pieces:

Tablesaw fixtures

Tablesaw fixtures

Knife Work

I suppose that means different things to different people. To me, in the context of this week, it means “repairs.” The chef’s knife handle was going to pieces:

Broken Knife

Broken Knife

The cracking has been present for a while, but it started getting loose, which is a recipe for damaged knife-wielder, so it was time to fix the problem. It didn’t take much effort to get apart, and it looks like there was a fair bit of rust and corrosion pushing things apart. One crack leads to this, eventually. The next step involves picking some new handle material, and preparing for reassembly:

Repairing the Knife

Repairing the Knife

I am using some offcuts from the hockey glass table project to make the new knife handle. I cleaned up the tang with a wire brush mounted on the drill press, and cut the wood to the correct thickness on the table saw. The end of the wood nearest the blade is canted out at 7° to match the casting. I used JB Weld to epoxy one side onto the tang and let it cure overnight.

Partially Repaired Knife

Partially Repaired Knife

Today, I pre-drilled through the holes to provide alignment after the other side is epoxied on, and used the scroll saw to get the profile partially cut. Finally, I epoxied on the far side and set that aside to cure until tomorrow. I also executed the first stage of assembly on that cabinet sled I was talking about a couple of days ago. Ciao!