Fixtures and Late Posting

Last night … I was playing Fallout 3, and went from game to sleep. My bad.

Today, I’m back in fabrication and assembly mode in the woodshop:

Cutting a rabbet

Cutting a rabbet

I’m running with the dadoe set installed for cutting 3/4″ slots for the shelves, but by embedding about half of that width into the sacrificial fence, I can also cut the rabbets for the back panel. Notice that I’m using a finger board to help keep the workpiece in control – a 4′ long side needs a third hand, and the finger board provides the safest method of control near the blades.

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Our condolences to Commander Price’s family, friends, and team:

  • Cdr. Job W. Price, 42, of Pottstown, Pennsylvania, died Dec. 22 of a non-combat related injury while supporting stability operations in Uruzgan Province, Afghanistan.

 

Knife and Fixtures

The work on the chef’s knife continued today:

Trimming the knife handle

Trimming the knife handle

The epoxy for side two cured overnight. I removed the clamps, and trimmed the sides down to near the tang, all the way around, using the scroll saw.

Sanding the knife handle

Sanding the knife handle

Sanding the knife handle was a multi-step process. This first phase used a couple of sizes and grits to get the wood down to the same profile as the tang. I used mini-sanding drums in the drill press for the task. Then I drilled through the rivet guide holes from the other side, then finished drilling the rivet profile in the handle. 0.177″ ∅ through, then 0.25″ ∅ drilled 0.21″ deep from each side for the rivet head.

I seated one side of each rivet using a hammer, after treating the drilled-out surface in the handle with cyanoacrylate adhesive. I put some more adhesive on the threads of the mating side and on the shoulder in the handle, then screwed each rivet together. Oh, yeah, the rivets: I got them from North Coast Knives – pleasant folks, quick & efficient order fulfillment, and lots of parts in stock for just about any sort of knife fabrication and repair you’re contemplating. Recommended!

Hacking off the rivet heads

Hacking off the rivet heads

Removing the rivet heads required application of the hacksaw. Sanding or grinding them all the way down would have caused too much heating … I know this, and caught it before I burnt the handle. Then sanding, a bit of carving, and a lot more sanding at progressively finer grits brought the knife to the place where I could apply the first coat of Danish Oil:

Applying finish

Applying finish

Three or four more applications are due, with sanding and/or rubbing with #0000 steel wool between each coat. This will be done Sunday, I think.

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 I also finished building my table saw fixtures today. Here in one image you can see both the outfeed extension table (the leg actually still needs hardware, so I’ll go get that tomorrow) and the over-size cross-cut sled I built. It’s not light, but it makes getting true 90° cuts possible on large pieces:

Tablesaw fixtures

Tablesaw fixtures

Knife Work

I suppose that means different things to different people. To me, in the context of this week, it means “repairs.” The chef’s knife handle was going to pieces:

Broken Knife

Broken Knife

The cracking has been present for a while, but it started getting loose, which is a recipe for damaged knife-wielder, so it was time to fix the problem. It didn’t take much effort to get apart, and it looks like there was a fair bit of rust and corrosion pushing things apart. One crack leads to this, eventually. The next step involves picking some new handle material, and preparing for reassembly:

Repairing the Knife

Repairing the Knife

I am using some offcuts from the hockey glass table project to make the new knife handle. I cleaned up the tang with a wire brush mounted on the drill press, and cut the wood to the correct thickness on the table saw. The end of the wood nearest the blade is canted out at 7° to match the casting. I used JB Weld to epoxy one side onto the tang and let it cure overnight.

Partially Repaired Knife

Partially Repaired Knife

Today, I pre-drilled through the holes to provide alignment after the other side is epoxied on, and used the scroll saw to get the profile partially cut. Finally, I epoxied on the far side and set that aside to cure until tomorrow. I also executed the first stage of assembly on that cabinet sled I was talking about a couple of days ago. Ciao!

Wood working

I’m getting going on the new office project. Remember that? Anyway, today I went shopping at Exotic Lumber in Gaithersburg. Sadly, I don’t have budget for any actual “exotic” lumber, so I got ten sheets of maple 3/4 ply, one sheet of cherry 3/4 ply, and three each of maple in 1/4 and 1/2 thickness. To get all this home, I rented a U-Haul truck for a few hours. I loaded it all into the garage, then set up for parting out the plywood.

Parting out the plywood

Parting out the plywood

The configuration is easy. Lightly glue (I used a low-tack spray adhesive) some foam to a sheet of plywood. Lay that out on saw horses. Then, one sheet at at time, use a straight edge, a couple of clamps, and a circular saw with a high-tooth count, thin kerf blade to part the sheets into “close” sizes. I sketched out on paper the cuts for each of the cabinets, and laid those out to minimize waste, then started cutting. As each component comes off the foam, I label it with some painters tape and a marker. By the time I was “done” and cleaned up for the day, I’d dismantled 8 sheets into the components to build the carcasses four shelving units, four base cabinets, and one upper cabinet.

Cabinet Carcass Parts

Cabinet Carcass Parts

Now what’s downstairs is ready and of a manageable size to work with the table saw. That and a panel sled, plus some housecleaning should fill the day, tomorrow.

6 Weeks

Just sayin’.

I finished this week’s schoolwork yesterday, so I managed to read the documentation for the new saw, adjust things that needed adjusting, and push some wood through the machine for the first time. Much easier to set up square and true. I still need to pay close attention to feed rate, because I didn’t want to spend 4 grand + an electrician to get a cabinet saw in… but it’s a very nice saw, and I’ve got it dialed in within about .005 on the fence, and an invisibly small fraction of a degree on the miter gauge. Happy, that.

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Our condolences to the families, friends, and units of these fallen warriors:

  • Cpl. Alex F. Domion, 21, of Richfield Springs, New York, died Oct. 31, as a result of a non-combat related incident in Helmand province, Afghanistan.
  • Petty Officer 2nd Class Matthew G. Kantor, 22, of Gillette, New Jersey, died supporting stability operations in Zabul, Afghanistan.

Nine Weeks Left

Ten actual weeks left in my quest to get my first BS. I’m in the last week of my penultimate class, and the instructor just cancelled another assignment. That’s nice and all, yo, but I’d been doing research and prep for it. That’s the second big syllabus change in an eight week session. Really? I would ask why, but I’d probably be angry at the answer, so it’s best to to let that one pass.

It’s Columbus Day, one of the Federal holidays my employer chooses to observe. So I’ll be using today to get ahead of the game on this last week’s work for this class. This upcoming weekend I’ll be at Capclave.

Along with finishing my schoolwork this weekend, I did a bit of design work with SketchUp to figure out what furniture I’m likely to build for my office, over the next few months.

Brian's proposed office furniture and layout

Brian’s proposed office furniture and layout

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Our condolences to the families, friends, and units of these fallen warriors:

  • Sgt. 1st Class Aaron A. Henderson, 33, of Houlton, Maine, died Oct. 2, at Bagram Air Base, Afghanistan, of wounds suffered when insurgents attacked his unit on Sept. 30 with an improvised explosive device in Zombalay Village, Afghanistan.
  • Sgt. Thomas J. Butler IV, 25, of Wilmington, North Carolina, died Oct.1, in Khost, Afghanistan, of injuries suffered when an insurgent detonated a suicide vest while he was on dismounted patrol.
  • Sgt. Jeremy F. Hardison, 23, of Maysville, North Carolina, died Oct.1, in Khost, Afghanistan, of injuries suffered when an insurgent detonated a suicide vest while he was on dismounted patrol.
  • Sgt. Donna R. Johnson, 29, of Raeford, North Carolina, died Oct.1, in Khost, Afghanistan, of injuries suffered when an insurgent detonated a suicide vest while she was on dismounted patrol.
  • Sgt. 1st Class Daniel T. Metcalfe, 29, of Liverpool, New York, died Sep. 29, in Sayyid Abad, Afghanistan, of injuries suffered when his unit was attacked with small arms fire.
  • Sgt. Camella M. Steedley, 31, of San Diego, California, died Oct. 3, while supporting combat operations in Helmand province, Afghanistan.
  • Warrant Officer Joseph L. Schiro, 27, of Coral Springs, Florida, died Oct. 6 in Chak district, Wardak Province, Afghanistan, of gunshot wounds suffered while on dismounted patrol.
  • Staff Sgt. Justin C. Marquez, 25, of Aberdeen, North Carolina, died Oct. 6 in Chak district, Wardak Province, Afghanistan, of gunshot wounds suffered while on dismounted patrol.

Continued Woodshop Reorganization

The “cart” I use for the jointer and the router table was empty space at the bottom, and when stored against the wall, I kept the compressor in the niche. But I had to move the compressor every time I wanted the cart out in the middle. Now the compressor rolls with the cart!

Compressor shelf added

Compressor shelf added

Previously seen on that shelf: an Aiwa boom box. This new setup uses the old Logitech system from my office desktop, providing an audio input for the iPhone, which also can charge (which is good in the low-signal environment in the basement):

New Woodshop Media Center

New Woodshop Media Center

Being a wood-hoarder, I broke down and chopped up two trash cans full of scrap lumber that was really never going to be used for anything ever again. I kept cherry, walnut, and maple strips that might suit for an inlay later, etc. But most of the crap wood is now in the trash, and I’ve cleared two corners. Lots accomplished today!

Now for the normal Monday chores. Ciao!

New Coffee Roasting Cart

So, I’ve got the week off, this week. And we’re not going anywhere, so I have time for projects, mixed in with the schoolwork. The first project is to clean up and reorganize the woodshop a bit. To do that, I need to get the coffee roaster and vent hood off of my workbench, where it’s lived for the last two years. I haven’t minded much, because I’ve been too busy to do much woodworking, but you never know.

Sitting in a box. I had components for a 6′ tall slender rack, rolling or standing. An alternative is to build two half-racks: one rolling, one standing. So I did, and the rolling cart, with a top applied, is the new roasting cart:

Coffee Roasting Cart

Coffee Roasting Cart

In a minute, the maintenance guy for our HVAC is going to be here, then I’ll continue with working in the shop. Ciao!